Links

Links to interesting information:

23 Amazing Sites For Free Gemology Courses & Resources

http://nevada-outback-gems.com/   This site has so much information I cannot list it all: identifying all metals in ores, prospecting, identifying minerals, sites to find your own rocks & minerals, etc.  This is a commercial site, but click on the tabs at the bottom of the page and you can learn a lot!

http://www.birthdayexpress.com/m/birthstone-gems     Rocks For Kids!

http://www.mindat.org/   Mindat.org   The world’s largest public database of mineral information.

http://geology.com/    Geology.com   News & information about Geology & Earth Science.

http://www.rockngem.com/    Rock and Gem Magazine    The leading magazine for the lapidary & mineral hobbyist.

http://www.rockhounds.com/   Bob’s Rock Shop  —  Online publication for rock collectors & lapidary hobbyists.

http://skywalker.cochise.edu/wellerr/students/fluorescent/soils.htm    Fluorescent Minerals

http://www.monnigmuseum.tcu.edu/visitors.htm    Oscar E. Monnig Meteorite Gallery    FREE World Class meteorite museum in Fort Worth, Texas.

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B7sU1l5EcQDLTUVBQXJIRkpWXzA/preview    The Story of Fluorescence (publication).

http://www.peaktopeak.com/njeffco/relatedlinks.php    North Jeffco Gem & Mineral Club

http://www.webelements.com/    The Periodic Table of Elements

http://www.nuggetshooter.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=7933    Secrets to Cutting, Etching, and Preserving Iron METEORITES.

http://digitalrockhound.blogspot.com/2009/10/celestite-locations-in-texas.html   http://www.lib.utexas.edu/books/landscapes/publications/txu-oclc-1033031/txu-oclc-1033031.pdf    Lampasas, Texas, Collecting  Texas CELESTITE.

http://suiseki.com/about/index.html    All about SUISEKI – The art of stone appreciation.

http://www.skamienialky.nazwa.pl/gallery.html    Gallery of Petrified Wood

http://ntrocks.com/   Nature’s Treasures, Austin, Texas.  This may be the largest rock & mineral store in Texas!  If you travel through Austin, you have to stop and shop.  Allow yourself no less that 4 hours to see everything in their store, outdoor rock yard, and annex with more rocks, tools, replacement parts, & fluorescent rocks room.

http://dallasmakerspace.org/   Dallas Makerspace, 1825 Monetary Lane, Suite 104, Carrollton, Texas.  The Dallas Makerspace is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, shared community workshop and laboratory. We are an organized group of local artists, engineers, makers, and thinkers who work together to provide tools and learning resources to the public.  We use these resources to collaborate on individual and community projects in order to promote science, technology and art; while working and experimenting on innovative ideas to encourage learning within our community. At the Dallas Makerspace we believe that collaboration is a truly effective form of learning. To that end, our members and volunteers teach classes, hold unique educational events and collaborate on cool projects.  Membership has its privileges:

  • 24/7 Access to our tools & space
  • A voice in how the organization is run
  • Discounts on some classes and workshops

http://www.mnh.si.edu/vtp/1-desktop   The Smithsonian Museum at your fingertips.
For anyone who hasn’t visited the Smithsonian…now you can!  This is a virtual tour, and it’s wonderful!  Use the full screen and read the directions below, but you can also fool around with the arrows once you’re in.
Here is something that is truly special, a virtual tour of the Smithsonian Museum, room by room!  It’s really something with a 360 degree viewing by using your cursor. You can operate the views by clicking/pressing on the various buttons and it is as though you are standing in the room!!! You could easily spend days/weeks looking at everything.
Just marvelous for kids and adults. You can click on the “-” and “+” buttons to zoom in and out to see detail or read a sign.  Follow the blue arrows on the floor to move into new rooms.
Shows inside and outside of the museum and there little cameras here and there which show detailed info on certain things. If you click on the floors (upper right corner) you get a floor plan of the selected floor.  You can click on a blue circle and go directly to that room.
Truly incredible web site. Look for the “arrows” on the floor and click on them. They take you to other places.

http://www.tomaszewski.net/Kreigh/Minerals/Homemade.shtml     Kreigh’s Homemade Lapidary Equipment:

  • Cutting Spheres
  • Drilling Holes in Stones
  • Make Your Own Classic Rock Tumbler
  • Make Your Own Open Top Rock Tumbler
  • Some Ramblings on Tumbling and Tumblers
  • Make Your Own Rock Saw
  • Some Thoughts on Horizontal Laps
  • Make a “Nutcracker” for Breaking Rocks or Geodes
  • Make a Pressure Sprayer for Cleaning Rocks
  • Metalworking
  • Grow Your Own Crystals
  • Make Your Own Faceting Machine
  • Make Your Own Elutriator to Recover Tumbling Grit
  • The “Wichita” Case
  • Polishing Rocks By Hand
  • The Roots of Amateur Lapidary
  • Whatever Happening to…(a brief history of lapidary equipment makers)

http://www.americangeode.com/events.php  American Geode Company – We publish gem shows & mineral shows, rockhounding, fossil events, news and commentary. Updates are twice an hour!

http://txpub.usgs.gov/dss/texasgeology/  United States Geological Survey (USGS).  Very interesting interactive geological website on Texas. 

http://colido.de/   Discover the new way of Collection Management

http://www.natures-gallery.com/index.html   Nature’s Gallery, a rock/mineral/fossil shop located in the old downtown square of Carrollton, Texas.  The owner is also a silversmith, goldsmith, and certified for every gemstone except pearls.

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/books/landscapes/publications/txu-oclc-1033031/txu-oclc-1033031.pdf   Texas Rocks and Minerals, An Amateur’s Guide, by Roselle M. Girard.  A 117 page book on rocks and minerals, where to collect, etc.  This was the first book I bought when I was in university 40 years ago.  It is a great introduction to the rocks and minerals in Texas.

http://www.rockhounds.com/oplc/         Faceters Companion CD
You can download a freeware Faceters Companion CD from Old Pueblo Lapidary Club. A great resource with over 60 designs for the faceters (or those thinking about it) in our club.

http://digitalrockhound.blogspot.com/p/features.html  Digital Rockhound’s Companion
The focus of this software is to provide location information for mineral collecting sites and mines and cross-reference against reported mineral occurrences and also against specimens in your mineral collection. Having more specific information about a mineral location adds interest and value to a specimen. Database contain over 400,000 locations and a mineralogy database with over 3,800 species.  Cost is $34.

How to Make a Polished Rock Handled Knife and Driftwood Trout Display
By Tom Kuzia


CLICK HERE FOR DEMONSTRATION

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